Greenfins Aquaculture Building

Greenfins Aquaculture Building

Interior Final

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Brown University: 117 Brown Street Faculty Residence

Brown University: 117 Brown Street Faculty Residence

LEED Silver Certification Achieved
The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded A4 Architecture with LEED Silver Certification in the LEED for Homes Rating System for 117 Brown Street Carriage House. As the USGBC states, “LEED certification identifies the project as a pioneering example of sustainable design, and demonstrates leadership in transforming the building industry.”
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Salve Regina: Ochre Lodge Carriage House

Salve Regina: Ochre Lodge Carriage House

“A4 Architecture helps see the Ochre Lodge Carriage House converted into a dormitory”

For more than forty years the Carriage House of the Ochre Lodge, on the campus of Salve Regina University, had been used as an unheated storage garage. Set in the midst of 19th century mansions and just a stone’s through away from the magnificent Breakers Estate, the exterior of the building deteriorated over the decades behind its boarded up windows. In 2010 A4 Architecture was engaged to try to take the site of the building and convert it to much needed dormitory space for the University. As it was set in the Historic District and the carriage house was typical of other structures in the neighborhood, A4 Architecture decided early in the process to try to bring the building back into productive use in a form that was as close to the original structure as possible. Using Building Information Modeling (BIM) technology, the firm set out to careful document the existing structure and try to figure a way it could be converted into a modern and comfortable dormitory for 14 students.

 Working closely with the facilities and planning staff of Salve University, the designer at A4 Architecture figured out a way to neatly fit the required number of rooms into the structure along with the living area, kitchen, mechanical room and other spaces that were required. At the same time, the firm worked hard to keep the traditional character of the building intact, even as the entire infrastructure was upgraded or replaced. At the ground level, a polished concrete floor not unlike the one original to the carriage house was installed only with radiant heating buried within it to keep the students warm in the winter even while achieving a very high level of fuel efficiency. The dormers on the second level were expanded just enough to allow for new egress code compliant windows to be installed, but not so much larger as to noticeably change the appearance o f the building. The old carriage house door was refinished and slid permanently into the open position to create a an historic backdrop for the living space and a new glass storefront was built to be the translucent reminder of the door in the closed position. As every design turn, A4 Architecture sought to reclaim components from the original design and structure, not only so that the amount of material shipped to the landfill was less but also so that the building could begin life with material patinated by time and use to create an environment which felt solid and old. The students are delighted with the result and rumor has it that Ochre Lodge Carriage House will be one of the most sought after dormitory spaces on campus!

 

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Newport and the Future of Planning: “What’s In, What’s Out in Real Estate”

Newport and the Future of Planning: “What’s In, What’s Out in Real Estate”

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On the Installation of Insulation: “Storm Windows and Insulation Save Money”

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The 2012 Architectural Symposium: “Trumbauer is Subject of Symposium”

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A Second Gilded Age for Beechwood?

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LEED Certification and Sustainable Design – “LEED Certification and Energy Efficiency”

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“Maya Lin and the Challenge of Creating Public Art”

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In 1981 when the judges of the Vietnam Memorial competition opened the envelope on the back of the winning entry board, they found the name “Maya Lin” and the address of a Yale dormitory where the young woman lived as an undergraduate student. From among more than 1400 entries, many submitted by large, internationally recognized architectural firms, Maya Lin’s concept was chosen for its simplicity, elegance and poignancy.

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The Newport Arboretum: “Seeing – and Saving – Newport’s Great Trees”

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