Monthly Archives: August 2013

“Doris Duke Preservation Awards to be Presented”

“Doris Duke Preservation Awards to be Presented”

Newport Rhode Island is fortunate to have one of the most intact collections of important 18th, 19thand early 20th Century buildings anywhere in America. But these buildings have not survived to the present day simply by not being torn down (although that was a useful starting point). For the most part, they are here because individuals and institutions took on the difficult and expensive task of preserving them and adapting them to be useful and relevant to present times. More

Zoning

Zoning

Before one can build in Newport, every project must pass zoning review. Zoning regulations are rules adopted by governments to control the use, density, height, setbacks and a myriad of other aspects of building. Starting in New York City in 1916, the use of “Zoning Ordinances” has spread outward until almost every jurisdiction in the United States had some form of zoning in place by the mid 1970’s. Newport’s zoning ordinance was adopted such that every lot created after April 13, 1977 is supposed to conform to the current regulations. More

‘Historic Tax Credit’ Revived

‘Historic Tax Credit’ Revived

This past week has been a notable one for historic preservation, as the long-idled Historic Tax Credit for restoring historic buildings was passed by the state General Assembly. The new program is a modification of an earlier one that was in effect prior to 2008.  Grow Smart Rhode Island, an organization dedicated both to encouraging the preservation and development of urban areas and the protection of rural farmlands, lobbied for reviving the program under which any individual project will be limited to $5 million in credits, and the program’s total pool funds will be limited to credits left unused from the previous program. More

“Developing an Eye for Design”

“Developing an Eye for Design”

Architects go beyond merely looking at the surface of a project to try and see through to the underlying issues.  These are skills that translate across many professions and areas of interest.  “Looking” is primarily the passive activity of gazing upon an object, but “seeing” is an active engagement that involves measuring proportion, studying detail, counting elements to ultimately understand the object more deeply, often through the act of drawing. More